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How Does This Keep My Drink Cold?
Our Insulated Drinks Bottle has been a runaway success and not just because it's personalised exactly the way you want it using our monogram design tool.  
But also because it is incredibly practical for so many reasons:  
  • it is endlessly reusable, replacing so many single use plastic bottles
  • it is slim enough to sit nicely in your backpack's side pocket or your car's cupholder
  • it is dishwasher safe
  • it won't break or crack
  • it's made of stainless steel which won't leach chemicals or aluminium into your drinks
  • our optional Flip Straw Lid converts it to an easy drink-on-the-go bottle
  • it keeps hot drinks hot even when it's freezing cold outside; and cold drinks cold all day long, even when it's sitting in the hot sun.  

Have you ever thought about this last point?  How does the Insulated Drinks Bottle keep hot drinks hot and cold drinks cold for so long?  

We asked Isabel, one of the clever young part-time staffers who helps us here in the studio when she's not at university studying Chemistry, to explain the GCSE physics behind this simple technology.
 
Insulated bottles effectively contain one bottle inside another.  A vacuum is created in the layer between the two bottles in which there are no air molecules... a vacuum is by definition a space with absolutely nothing in it.  So that's the bottle explained.  
Next comes the science.  Heat is transferred through the vibration of air molecules.  In a normal water bottle, that vibration of warm air-temperature molecules around the cold water in the bottle will transfer heat from the air outside to the water inside and warm it up.  But in the case of the Insulated Bottle, there are no air molecules to transfer the heat so the contents will stay at the same temperature for hours.  In theory a cold drink could stay cold forever but, in practice, heat transfer can take place through the lid so there will be some gradual warming.  Or cooling, in the case of a hot drink.
We put our bottle to the test by pouring boiling water straight from the kettle in to the bottle at 8pm and put the lid on tightly.  The bottle remained cool to the touch despite the boiling hot contents, which in itself is pretty amazing.  It got ever so slightly warm towards the top of the bottle where some heat transfer was happening through the cap.  We checked on it again the next morning at 8am.  When we took the cap off, the water inside was still steaming hot.  
So now we're thinking that this is the solution for summer picnics to keep the pinot grigio and rose cool even when the sun is blazing...  we're gearing up to launch a 1000ml version of our Insulated Drinks Bottle just for this purpose.
Pretty cool, right?  (pun not intended)